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UNICEF

UNICEF, or the United Nations Children's Fund, is a UN agency that works to promote the rights and well-being of children around the world.
UNICEF
Leadership team

Catherine Russell (Executive Director)

Omar Abdi (Deputy Executive Director, Programmes)

Karin Hulshof (Deputy Executive Director, Partnerships)

Hannan Sulieman (UNICEF Deputy Executive Director, Management)

Headquarters
New York
Region served
Over 190 countries, including Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe and Central Asia, Latin America and the Carribean, Middle East and North Africa.
Year stablished
1946
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Summary

UNICEF, originally called the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund in full, now officially United Nations Children's Fund, is an agency of the United Nations responsible for providing humanitarian and developmental aid to children worldwide. The agency is among the most widespread and recognizable social welfare organizations in the world, with a presence in 192 countries and territories. UNICEF's activities include providing immunizations and disease prevention, administering treatment for children and mothers with HIV, enhancing childhood and maternal nutrition, improving sanitation, promoting education, and providing emergency relief in response to disasters.

UNICEF is the successor of the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund, created on 11 December 1946, in New York, by the U.N. Relief Rehabilitation Administration to provide immediate relief to children and mothers affected by World War II. The same year, the U.N. General Assembly established UNICEF to further institutionalize post-war relief work. In 1950, its mandate was extended to address the long-term needs of children and women, particularly in developing countries. In 1953, the organization became a permanent part of the United Nations System, and its name was subsequently changed to its current form, though it retains the original acronym.

UNICEF relies entirely on voluntary contributions from governments and private donors. Its total income as of 2020 was $7.2 billion; of which public-sector partners contributed $5.45 billion. It is governed by a 36-member executive board that establishes policies, approves programs, and oversees administrative and financial plans. The board is made up of government representatives elected by the United Nations Economic and Social Council, usually for three-year terms.


History

UNICEF, or the United Nations Children's Fund, was established in 1946 in response to the needs of children affected by World War II. The agency was created by the United Nations General Assembly to provide emergency relief and long-term support to children in war-torn countries and other areas affected by conflict, poverty, and disease.

In its early years, UNICEF focused primarily on providing emergency aid, including food, shelter, and medical care, to children in need. The agency also played a key role in responding to major humanitarian crises, such as the Korean War and the refugee crisis following the partition of India and Pakistan.

In the decades that followed, UNICEF expanded its scope to include a broader range of programs and initiatives aimed at promoting the rights and well-being of children around the world. The agency began to focus on long-term development and worked to improve access to healthcare, education, and clean water and sanitation for children in developing countries.

In the 1980s, UNICEF launched its landmark Child Survival and Development Revolution, which aimed to reduce child mortality rates and improve child health and nutrition. This initiative, along with other programs focused on maternal and child health, helped to significantly reduce child mortality rates in many parts of the world.

Today, UNICEF continues to work in over 190 countries and territories around the world, supporting programs and initiatives aimed at promoting the rights and well-being of children. The agency's work is guided by the belief that every child has the right to grow and develop in a safe, healthy, and nurturing environment, and that investing in children is essential for building a more just and equitable world.


Goals and Purpose

The goals and purpose of UNICEF, or the United Nations Children's Fund, are centered around promoting the rights and well-being of children worldwide. The organisation's mission is to advocate for the protection and fulfillment of children's rights, to help meet their basic needs and expand their opportunities, and to support them in reaching their full potential. Some of the key goals and purposes of UNICEF include:

Providing humanitarian assistance: UNICEF works to provide emergency aid to children and families affected by conflict, natural disasters, and other crises, including food, shelter, clean water and sanitation, and medical care.

Promoting health and nutrition: UNICEF works to improve access to healthcare and nutrition for children, with a particular focus on reducing child mortality rates and addressing malnutrition.

Ensuring access to education: UNICEF works to ensure that all children have access to quality education, with a focus on promoting gender equality and addressing disparities in access to education.

Protecting children from violence and exploitation: UNICEF works to protect children from abuse, neglect, and exploitation, and to promote their participation in decision-making processes that affect their lives.

Advocating for children's rights: UNICEF works to promote and protect children's rights, including through advocacy efforts aimed at influencing policies and legislation at the national and international levels.


Impact

Improved access to healthcare: UNICEF has played a key role in improving access to healthcare for children and their families, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. The agency has helped to reduce child mortality rates by providing vaccines, training healthcare workers, and promoting basic hygiene and sanitation practices.

Increased access to education: UNICEF has worked to increase access to education for children around the world, particularly in developing countries. The agency has helped to build schools, train teachers, and provide educational materials to children in need.

Reduction in child malnutrition: UNICEF has helped to reduce child malnutrition rates by providing access to nutrient-rich foods, promoting breastfeeding, and supporting community-based nutrition programs.

Protection from violence and exploitation: UNICEF has worked to protect children from violence and exploitation, including through programs aimed at preventing child labor, child trafficking, and child marriage. The agency has also worked to protect children affected by conflict, displacement, and other humanitarian crises.

Promotion of children's rights: UNICEF has played a key role in promoting children's rights and advocating for their protection and fulfillment. The agency has worked to ensure that children's rights are enshrined in national laws and policies, and has advocated for the inclusion of children's voices in decision-making processes at all levels.


References
UNICEF
Leadership team

Catherine Russell (Executive Director)

Omar Abdi (Deputy Executive Director, Programmes)

Karin Hulshof (Deputy Executive Director, Partnerships)

Hannan Sulieman (UNICEF Deputy Executive Director, Management)

Headquarters
New York
Region served
Over 190 countries, including Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe and Central Asia, Latin America and the Carribean, Middle East and North Africa.
Year stablished
1946
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