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United Nations Crisis Relief

The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) helps humanitarian organizations save the lives of people caught in crises.
United Nations Crisis Relief
Leadership team

António Guterres (Chair of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Mia Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados (Champions of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Sheikh Hasina, Prime Minister of Bangladesh (Champion of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Mette Frederiksen, Prime Minister of Denmark (Champions of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Olaf Scholz, Chancellor of Germany (Champions of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Macky Sall, President of Senegal (Champions of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Joko Widodo, President of Indonesia (Champions of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Headquarters
New York and Geneva
Region served
Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa
Year stablished
1990
Social Media
Summary

The United Nations Crisis Relief program, also known as the United Nations humanitarian response, is a coordinated effort to provide emergency assistance to people affected by crises around the world. The program is led by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) and works in partnership with other United Nations agencies, governments, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and the private sector to deliver life-saving assistance and protection to those in need.

The United Nations Crisis Relief program aims to address various crises, including natural disasters, conflicts, and other emergencies. The program provides essential assistance to people affected by crises, including food, water, shelter, and medical care. The program also works to protect vulnerable populations, including children, women, and refugees, from harm and abuse.

The United Nations Crisis Relief program operates globally, responding to crises in various regions, including Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas. The program uses a coordinated approach to ensure that assistance is delivered effectively and efficiently, with the goal of saving lives and reducing suffering.

The program's activities include assessing the needs of affected populations, mobilizing resources and partnerships, coordinating responses, and monitoring and evaluating interventions. The United Nations Crisis Relief program also works to build resilience and preparedness in communities to mitigate the impact of future crises.

The United Nations Crisis Relief program responds to various types of crises, including natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, and hurricanes, as well as complex emergencies such as conflicts and displacement. The program also provides assistance to address other humanitarian needs, such as food insecurity, malnutrition, and disease outbreaks.


History

The United Nations Crisis Relief program has its roots in the humanitarian response efforts of the United Nations since its inception in 1945. The United Nations was created in the aftermath of World War II to prevent another global conflict and promote peace and security around the world. One of the UN's earliest efforts in humanitarian relief was in response to the 1947 partition of India, which resulted in a massive displacement of people and violence. The UN established the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) to provide emergency assistance to those affected by the partition.

Over time, the UN's humanitarian response efforts expanded to address various crises, including natural disasters and conflicts. In 1956, the UN created the Office of Emergency Operations (OEO) to coordinate emergency assistance to countries affected by disasters, such as floods and earthquakes. The OEO later became the United Nations Disaster Relief Organization (UNDRO) in 1972, which was responsible for coordinating international disaster response efforts.

In 1991, the UN created the Department of Humanitarian Affairs (DHA) to consolidate its humanitarian response efforts under one umbrella. The DHA was responsible for coordinating emergency assistance to people affected by crises, including refugees, internally displaced persons (IDPs), and victims of natural disasters and conflicts. In 1998, the DHA established the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) to further strengthen its humanitarian response coordination efforts.

Since its establishment, the United Nations Crisis Relief program has responded to various crises around the world, including natural disasters, conflicts, and other emergencies. Some notable examples include the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis, and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Today, the United Nations Crisis Relief program continues to be led by OCHA and works in partnership with other United Nations agencies, governments, NGOs, and the private sector to provide emergency assistance and protection to people affected by crises worldwide. The program uses a coordinated approach to ensure that aid is delivered effectively and efficiently, with the goal of saving lives and reducing suffering. Additionally, the program works to build resilience and preparedness in communities to mitigate the impact of future crises.


Goals and Purpose

The goals and purpose of the United Nations Crisis Relief program are to provide emergency assistance and protection to people affected by crises around the world. The program aims to save lives and reduce suffering by addressing the immediate needs of affected populations, including food, water, shelter, and medical care. In addition, the program works to protect vulnerable populations, including children, women, and refugees, from harm and abuse.

The United Nations Crisis Relief program operates globally and responds to various crises, including natural disasters, conflicts, and other emergencies. The program uses a coordinated approach to ensure that aid is delivered effectively and efficiently, with the goal of reaching those in need as quickly as possible. The program also works to build resilience and preparedness in communities to mitigate the impact of future crises.

The program's specific goals include:

To provide life-saving assistance: The United Nations Crisis Relief program aims to provide essential assistance, including food, water, shelter, and medical care, to people affected by crises.

To protect vulnerable populations: The program works to protect vulnerable populations, including children, women, and refugees, from harm and abuse.

To coordinate responses: The program coordinates responses among various actors, including United Nations agencies, governments, NGOs, and the private sector, to ensure that aid is delivered effectively and efficiently.

To build resilience and preparedness: The program works to build resilience and preparedness in communities to mitigate the impact of future crises.

To monitor and evaluate interventions: The program monitors and evaluates interventions to ensure that they are meeting the needs of affected populations and that aid is being delivered effectively.


Impact

Saving lives: The program provides emergency assistance, including food, water, shelter, and medical care, to people affected by crises, which helps to prevent deaths due to hunger, dehydration, or lack of access to healthcare. For example, during the 2010 Haiti earthquake, the program provided emergency medical care, shelter, and food to over 3 million people.

Reducing suffering: The program helps to reduce the suffering of people affected by crises by providing essential assistance and protection, such as shelter, clean water, and healthcare. For example, during the Syrian refugee crisis, the program provided shelter, food, and healthcare to millions of refugees who had fled the conflict.

Providing protection to vulnerable populations: The program works to protect vulnerable populations, including children, women, and refugees, from harm and abuse. For example, during the Rohingya refugee crisis in Bangladesh, the program provided protection and shelter to women and children who had fled violence in Myanmar.

Strengthening communities: The program works to build resilience and preparedness in communities to mitigate the impact of future crises. For example, the program has helped to build disaster-resistant infrastructure in countries prone to natural disasters, such as Haiti and Nepal.

Coordinating responses: The program coordinates responses among various actors, including United Nations agencies, governments, NGOs, and the private sector, to ensure that aid is delivered effectively and efficiently. For example, during the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the program coordinated the efforts of various organizations to ensure that aid was delivered quickly and efficiently.

Facilitating long-term recovery: The program supports long-term recovery efforts, including rebuilding infrastructure, providing livelihood support, and promoting community development. For example, after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the program helped to rebuild infrastructure and provide livelihood support to affected communities.

Advocating for humanitarian needs: The program advocates for the needs of people affected by crises, including refugees, internally displaced persons (IDPs), and victims of natural disasters and conflicts. For example, the program advocates for increased funding and support for refugees and IDPs around the world.


References
United Nations Crisis Relief
Leadership team

António Guterres (Chair of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Mia Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados (Champions of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Sheikh Hasina, Prime Minister of Bangladesh (Champion of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Mette Frederiksen, Prime Minister of Denmark (Champions of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Olaf Scholz, Chancellor of Germany (Champions of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Macky Sall, President of Senegal (Champions of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Joko Widodo, President of Indonesia (Champions of the Global Crisis Response Group)

Headquarters
New York and Geneva
Region served
Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa
Year stablished
1990
Social Media